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Old 08-14-2017, 11:45 AM   #36
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As a young kid I was walking a small creek with some friends when I was told to "Freeze, there is a Moccasin". I froze in place while looking around me, not seeing a snake.

Then I heard noise in the tree limb above my head. The guy behind me grabbed the Moccasin by the tail, and popped the snake like a whip. The Moccasin lost part of its head, but it was now dead and that was what counted.
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Old 08-14-2017, 12:56 PM   #37
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Killed a copperhead yesterday that was too close to the house, normally I let them alone when not so near.

I found a copperhead right next to my back patio last night. Had just stepped right next to it, wearing slide on sandals (no socks). It was coiled up half under a leaf. Bastard slithered under the porch right as I came down on it with the shingle-stripper. Only got a piece of its' tail as it was getting away.
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Old 08-14-2017, 01:04 PM   #38
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Then there was the time a water moccasin came at us on a subdivision street and the whole survey crew screamed like little girls and jumped in the truck and we ran it over, several times, to be sure.

I hate snakes.
There was a vid a while back, someone put rubber snakes and turtles on a road. EVERYONE swerved out of their lane to take out the snakes, Everyone swerved to avoid the turtles. A few even got out and tried to shoo it off the road...
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Old 08-14-2017, 02:39 PM   #39
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First off, snakes don't chase people. They view us as predators. I worked in a sanctuary and have handled tons of them (all kinds of venomous) though I don't anymore. It always makes me laugh when people say they got chased. I chalk it up to fear and confusion. I've handled everything from green mambas to rattlesnakes and none of them ever "chased" me. The only snake I dared not handle was a 7 foot black mamba that came into the sanctuary. I was straight up terrified of that snake, and I had never been scared of a snake before.

To the guy with the photo of the baby snake, that's a gray rat snake, not a rattlesnake.

My craziest snake story, I got too close to a Southern Pacific rattlesnake (I was a teenager) and it got one fang into my finger. I spent almost a week in the hospital. No pain, but immediate and extreme swelling. After about an hour I started having difficulty breathing, but I was already in the hospital by then. I received 6 vials of antivenin and my blood chemistry was messed up for almost 2 weeks after my discharge from the hospital. My platelet levels had dropped dramatically (which increases your risk of internal bleeding). I recovered fully though and learned my lesson.

Generally speaking, rattlesnakes (depending on the species) are far less dangerous than people think. Smaller ones of the same species are generally less dangerous (despite the myth that babies inject more venom, they don't). Some species like sidewinders and Pygmy rattlesnakes are too small to kill a human (and have no deaths recorded). Big diamondbacks, mojaves, timbers, and pacific rattlesnake bites can indeed be life threatening though and these represent the most dangerous snakes we have in the U.S.

Either way, the untreated mortality (chances of death if you don't go to the hospital) of a Western diamondback bite, for example, is 10-20%. So you have an 80-90% chance of survival without antivenin if you're healthy (I am by no means saying don't go to the hospital! You can die or lose a body part!). On the other end of that scale, the untreated mortality of a black mamba bite is 100%. Nobody has ever survived its bite without treatment.
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:25 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by Shadow Walker View Post
As a young kid I was walking a small creek with some friends when I was told to "Freeze, there is a Moccasin". I froze in place while looking around me, not seeing a snake.

Then I heard noise in the tree limb above my head. The guy behind me grabbed the Moccasin by the tail, and popped the snake like a whip. The Moccasin lost part of its head, but it was now dead and that was what counted.
Snakes in trees. Had it happen. Killed the 4th copperhead. Now they're at the neighbors.
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:32 PM   #41
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Funny to the snake anyway. I was in the backyard years ago and reached down to pick up a gum wrapper. Heard the rustling,buzzing of a rattler. Jumped back as it striked right where my face had been.
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:35 PM   #42
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Found it:

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Old 08-14-2017, 06:42 PM   #43
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Except for two rattlesnakes which I left alone, I've caught almost every other snake that I've seen in my life. Made a few of them pets. King snakes make awesome pets. You guys are all a bunch on Nancy boys.
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:51 PM   #44
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Many years ago I was in the car business. I had an older lady customer who had been bitten by a rattler while she was weeding the flower garden in her yard. She felt a sting but didn't realize what it was for a while. Once she did, she drove 15 miles to a hospital.

Too late. When she told me this story, her ring finger (I forget which hand) was solid black and she was scheduled to have it amputated in a few days.
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Old 08-14-2017, 07:37 PM   #45
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That's why I killed every venomous snake I see. Ain't no snake worth a human life.

And, they dang sure ain't worth my life!!
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Old 08-14-2017, 07:54 PM   #46
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Long story short. When I was a kid a bastard neighbor shot our female Malmute with a 12 ga for supposedly chasing deer. My brother & I came home to her howling in agony in our garage with her chest caked in blood & pooling at her feet. We called our Dad in a panic not knowing what to do. 'Tasha' died not long after. A few days later I found a dead bull snake & put it in the bastards mailbox...they moved shortly after.

Even if she had been chasing deer, he should have told us & we would have handled it. Still hear her howls to this day.

ETA: Not really a snake story I know but it brought up that memory.
I'm sorry for your loss. The prick who killed your dog deserved far worse to happen to him.
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:08 PM   #47
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At the cabinet shop I work in we keep several old pairs of shoes for when we're doing finish/paint work so we don't ruin our regular shoes, this little guy crawled out of one. This was taken last year, for scale, the little diamond shaped thing on the floor is actually a glazier's point for installing glass in old windows. Pretty sure it's a baby Timber Rattler.
[IMG][/IMG]
That's a baby rat snake aka chicken snake belonging to the family of Elaphe..
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:22 PM   #48
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Well I guess I just happened to be in the path of a retreating snake that was up in the air coming toward me and wow, when I altered course he did at the exact same time. Now maybe he wouldn't have followed me far but he sure as heck did until I whacked him and yeah I was terrified for just a few seconds.

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First off, snakes don't chase people. They view us as predators. I worked in a sanctuary and have handled tons of them (all kinds of venomous) though I don't anymore. It always makes me laugh when people say they got chased. I chalk it up to fear and confusion. I've handled everything from green mambas to rattlesnakes and none of them ever "chased" me. The only snake I dared not handle was a 7 foot black mamba that came into the sanctuary. I was straight up terrified of that snake, and I had never been scared of a snake before.

To the guy with the photo of the baby snake, that's a gray rat snake, not a rattlesnake.

My craziest snake story, I got too close to a Southern Pacific rattlesnake (I was a teenager) and it got one fang into my finger. I spent almost a week in the hospital. No pain, but immediate and extreme swelling. After about an hour I started having difficulty breathing, but I was already in the hospital by then. I received 6 vials of antivenin and my blood chemistry was messed up for almost 2 weeks after my discharge from the hospital. My platelet levels had dropped dramatically (which increases your risk of internal bleeding). I recovered fully though and learned my lesson.

Generally speaking, rattlesnakes (depending on the species) are far less dangerous than people think. Smaller ones of the same species are generally less dangerous (despite the myth that babies inject more venom, they don't). Some species like sidewinders and Pygmy rattlesnakes are too small to kill a human (and have no deaths recorded). Big diamondbacks, mojaves, timbers, and pacific rattlesnake bites can indeed be life threatening though and these represent the most dangerous snakes we have in the U.S.

Either way, the untreated mortality (chances of death if you don't go to the hospital) of a Western diamondback bite, for example, is 10-20%. So you have an 80-90% chance of survival without antivenin if you're healthy (I am by no means saying don't go to the hospital! You can die or lose a body part!). On the other end of that scale, the untreated mortality of a black mamba bite is 100%. Nobody has ever survived its bite without treatment.
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:50 PM   #49
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That's a baby rat snake aka chicken snake belonging to the family of Elaphe..
It looked a heck of a lot like a pit viper but you may be right, we caught it in a bucket and released it.
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:45 PM   #50
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First off, snakes don't chase people. They view us as predators. I worked in a sanctuary and have handled tons of them (all kinds of venomous) though I don't anymore. It always makes me laugh when people say they got chased. I chalk it up to fear and confusion. I've handled everything from green mambas to rattlesnakes and none of them ever "chased" me. The only snake I dared not handle was a 7 foot black mamba that came into the sanctuary. I was straight up terrified of that snake, and I had never been scared of a snake before.

To the guy with the photo of the baby snake, that's a gray rat snake, not a rattlesnake.

My craziest snake story, I got too close to a Southern Pacific rattlesnake (I was a teenager) and it got one fang into my finger. I spent almost a week in the hospital. No pain, but immediate and extreme swelling. After about an hour I started having difficulty breathing, but I was already in the hospital by then. I received 6 vials of antivenin and my blood chemistry was messed up for almost 2 weeks after my discharge from the hospital. My platelet levels had dropped dramatically (which increases your risk of internal bleeding). I recovered fully though and learned my lesson.

Generally speaking, rattlesnakes (depending on the species) are far less dangerous than people think. Smaller ones of the same species are generally less dangerous (despite the myth that babies inject more venom, they don't). Some species like sidewinders and Pygmy rattlesnakes are too small to kill a human (and have no deaths recorded). Big diamondbacks, mojaves, timbers, and pacific rattlesnake bites can indeed be life threatening though and these represent the most dangerous snakes we have in the U.S.

Either way, the untreated mortality (chances of death if you don't go to the hospital) of a Western diamondback bite, for example, is 10-20%. So you have an 80-90% chance of survival without antivenin if you're healthy (I am by no means saying don't go to the hospital! You can die or lose a body part!). On the other end of that scale, the untreated mortality of a black mamba bite is 100%. Nobody has ever survived its bite without treatment.
If not mistaken, the most dangerous venom in the U.S. belongs to the coral snake, the coral belongs to the elapid family and cobras are part of the same family.. Thing is corals are generally minute in size so bites are a rare occurrence ..2nd most is a rattle snake found in California, thinking green but been sometime since playing with snakes and venomous was not a primary interest.. Other wise Thumbs up Hi power..
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Old 08-15-2017, 12:03 AM   #51
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I lived at a place for a few years that was awesome, 12 acre lake with bass up to 12 lb, catfish in the 20lb range, you get the idea, awesome EXCEPT for the rattle snakes. We killed 30 to 40 a year just around the two houses.

One night my son gets up off the couch to go to bed and as he walks by the front door says, "Hey is that a real snake?" I look over past him to see a young rattlesnake stretched out on the floor and told him to get away from it.

Not being a huge fan of venomous snakes, non ven are great by me, my preferred method of disposal would be from 15 ft away with a 12 gauge. Unfortunately not an option in your entry way. I grabbed a "swiffer" and a chefs knife, went out side and came in behind the snake. Used the swiffer to pin him with just the head sticking out and sliced off the head. Used kitchen tongs to pick up and dispose of the head and put the 20 inch body into a ziplock and fridge as the neighbor kept the skins and ate them.

Then I had several shots of pendalton and tried to go to bed after turning over every item of furniture in the house. Had nightmares about dam snakes in the house for weeks and would not get up at night without turning lights on....

After thinking about it, I should have had my son video it. Would have made a great commercial for swiffer, "How a real man uses a Swiffer"....
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Old 08-15-2017, 01:44 PM   #52
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I'm sorry for your loss. The prick who killed your dog deserved far worse to happen to him.

Thanks, & yeah, I wanted to do much worse, but it was all I could think of at 12 years old. The whole family was a bunch of inbreds.
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Old 08-15-2017, 02:37 PM   #53
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As for the "snakes don't chase people" statement. The truth is very different.

I was going fishing one day; carried my rod & reel in my left hand and a M-1 Carbine in the right hand with a round chambered & safety on.

As I walked along side the pond I made a right turn to go around a tree, walked a few feet more.....and saw a Moccasin coiled up on the trail about 15 feet away. As soon as I stopped walking the Moccasin made a bee-line for me.

I immediately started walking backwards...and backed into the tree (surprise, surprise!!). The Moccasin had not stopped and would have bite me if I had not been carrying the M-1 Carbine cocked & loaded. All I had to do was flip off the safety with my trigger finger, and fire.

I was a little surprised I hit the fast moving Moccasin, but I hit it in the head. Needless to say it was dead.

Being a little nervous about snakes "now", I decided to go home. As I walked back down the trail, I heard a lot of noise ahead about 20 feet from the pond, and then saw a Moccasin moving so fast it seemed to fly off the bank (about 1 & a half foot high) and clear the water for over six feet before it the hit the water. If the Moccasin that came for me had been moving that fast, I might not be typing this now.

Last edited by Shadow Walker; 08-16-2017 at 01:31 PM.
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Old 08-15-2017, 08:44 PM   #54
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If not mistaken, the most dangerous venom in the U.S. belongs to the coral snake, the coral belongs to the elapid family and cobras are part of the same family.. Thing is corals are generally minute in size so bites are a rare occurrence ..2nd most is a rattle snake found in California, thinking green but been sometime since playing with snakes and venomous was not a primary interest.. Other wise Thumbs up Hi power..
Mojave Green

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Crotalus scutulatus (common names: Mojave rattlesnake, Mojave green), is a highly venomous pit viper species found in the deserts of the southwestern United States and central Mexico. It is perhaps best known for its potent neurotoxic-hemotoxic venom, which is considered the world's most potent rattlesnake venom.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crotalus_scutulatus
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:06 PM   #55
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If not mistaken, the most dangerous venom in the U.S. belongs to the coral snake, the coral belongs to the elapid family and cobras are part of the same family.. Thing is corals are generally minute in size so bites are a rare occurrence ..2nd most is a rattle snake found in California, thinking green but been sometime since playing with snakes and venomous was not a primary interest.. Other wise Thumbs up Hi power..
Everyone views "the most dangerous" differently. In the U.S., Western diamondbacks account for the most deaths because they are so common and widespread. The snake that's most likely to actually kill you if you don't go to the hospital in the U.S. is the mojave rattlesnake. Even though coral snake venom is drop for drop more toxic, the mojave has much bigger venom glands and injects far more venom. Coral snake bites are recorded as having a 10% untreated death rate. The chances of you dying from a mojave rattlesnake bite with no hospital is about 30-40%, which is a massive figure when compared to other rattlesnakes.

http://www.toxinology.com is an excellent resource for the untreated mortalities and venom characteristics. They're operating out of the university of Adelaide in Australia which is one of, if not the best, source for information on animal venom.

I must say though the relatively low untreated mortality for western and eastern diamondbacks is in my opinion because of people getting bitten by smaller ones. If a very large western or eastern diamondback gets a solid two fangs into you, I can't imagine survival rate being good if you skip the hospital. Same goes with large canebrakes/timbers.
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Old 08-18-2017, 01:00 PM   #56
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When I was getting my degree in Geology I spent time at Sul Ross University in Alpine TX. Most of the time we were camping somewhere near Big Bend National Park and hiking the area to map the rock formations. We always carried a long staff and saw many rattle snakes. Those we could catch we would kill (usually by pinning and either smashing the head or cutting it off), skin and eat after cooking over the fire. The skins made many a nice hat band and decorated the hiking staff.
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Old 08-18-2017, 01:47 PM   #57
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Pigmy rattler. Were you at killdeer?

Edit: We'll have to meet up some night I don't work and you don't either.
Yes. Killdeer plains.
http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index...5_species.html

Bunch of websites say Eastern Massasauga Rattler. It does look a lot like a pygmy.

Saw tons of pygmy rattlers as a kid in Florida. More than a few Easter Diamondbacks as well. Some 7 foot 25 lb'ers in there.

Shooting at LaRue saturday. Pistol day at a friend's private range.

Time for a PM. Incoming.
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Old 08-18-2017, 06:04 PM   #58
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That's a baby rat snake aka chicken snake belonging to the family of Elaphe..
Thank you Timmy59 . You are quite correct . It is a juvenile Gray Rat or Black Rat snake .
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Old 08-18-2017, 08:33 PM   #59
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Riding dirt bikes back in the 70's around a track that was laid out on so called "silt basins" near a local river. Maybe it was something about the time of year but the black silt and the track were covered with many hundreds if not a few thousand Black Racers. Nothing like getting roosted with flying silt and angry snakes. In the back of my mind I couldn't help but think about how horrible it would be to crash and not be able to get up. You would be covered by these little monsters in no time. On top of that snakes of any type always have and always will scare the living shit out of me.

So after having a real good time chewing up snakes with our knobby's we decided to seek some relief from the sun in the little bit of shade that was available. Under some trees next to a large abandoned in ground pool in the middle of no wear. Freaky thing in it's self. Next thing you know grandpa Black Racer comes charging out of some tall grass and weeds and attacks us. Largest snake I've ever seen that wasn't behind some glass at the zoo. Seven or eight feet long and as thick as my arm with a big pink mouth. He ran us off the area till we gathered our courage some large sticks and went back and beat his nasty ass real good. He finally gave up and slithered into the pool.

Then just for good measure we fired up the bikes and went back out and ran over a bunch of his friends.

I love nature but absolutely hate snakes. Fuck snakes.
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Old 08-18-2017, 11:49 PM   #60
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Just today I was out walking through Roxborough State Park in Colorado (which is a beautiful place) this morning and I thought I saw a stick laying on the trail.... Well, it wasn't a stick. I get about 10 yards away and it's a full grown (I'm thinking about 4 feet in reality, but I'm not a fan of snakes so it looked like a 10 foot monster at the time) prairie rattlesnake. It slithered off the trail and into the woods but I'd be lying if I didn't say it startled (or more like scared the piss) out of me.

Other than that, the biggest oh crap moment I've had with snakes was many years ago when I was unloading a trailer full of trees that had come from Florida. Out popped a probably 5 foot rat snake. I know they aren't poisonous (and are actually good for keeping pests in check), but I ran a good 30 yards before further assessing the situation.

Yep, I really don't like snakes.
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Old 08-19-2017, 03:18 PM   #61
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My local range is basically all old quarry ( sandstone ). At a range clean up day many years back a baby copperhead was killed so a mom & dad have to be somewhere.

Most rattlers are in the southern part of the state but you never know.
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