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Old 03-25-2017, 09:35 AM   #806
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Originally Posted by yuik View Post
What?

I only do low cost index funds. Vanguard admiral shares or schwab etfs the expense ratios are all well under .08%.

Also I think you can do tax harvesting, which is harder to do with individual stocks. Ie let's say the s&p is down before tax season, sell your schwab s&p fund and on the same day buy a vanguard s&p 500 fund. Or swap from one large cap to another. I don't mess with this as much, but I think one can argue that until he learns how to interpret a companies financials a few index funds might mirage any rookie mess ups.
See rstrobel's post above.

If you do mutual funds in a retirement vehicle like a 401K or IRA it's all fine.

If you use a brokerage account, you will get hit for taxes in an undesirable way.

Expense fees have nothing to do with it.
Neither does any load on the fund.

Since AK-104 has $50K to play with, he'd have to use a brokerage account.



Let's say the fund you've just bought picked up AAPL 10 years ago and bought it for $25.

Now it's worth $140.
You buy the fund.

Next week it goes down to $130 and your fund decides to sell a pile of it before it goes down further.

Now, you just lost $10/share.

However, at the end of the year, the fund will give you a tax bill on the $105/share profit.

So, you lost money but you pay a portion of the tax for those who gained over the years.


Mutual funds are best used in retirement vehicles, UNLESS you get it at the beginning, I suppose.


I learned this the heard way and try to pass my experience on to others.

It's one more reason I stick with individual stocks.
Occasionally, I do an ETF but I can usually do better picking the best prospects in a sector or industry so why should I blunt my returns?


You can stay diversified, which is key, pick individual stocks at the more propitious times to buy or sell, rather than getting stuck with a bunch in various spots on their respective chart.

All that said, I wish I did better than I do, and I should, but nothing goes perfect.
I tend to buy and sell too early but I still make money.

Been doing this for 3 years and 3 months.
I'm doubling the return of the market over that time.
Too much effort to do so, however. lol
I should be doing 50% returns IMO but I'm not getting close to that.
Keep learning though.
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Old 03-25-2017, 09:54 AM   #807
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Originally Posted by yuik View Post
If I had to pick only 5 stocks off the top of my head not looking at any lists I have this is what they would be

Adobe (had Facebook but I think it can be unseated, I still love what they are doing with Instagram, also had salesforce here but yanked them).
MasterCard (decided against Google or Microsoft )
Amazon (if I didn't pick Microsoft, would want some cloud commodity exposure)
Schlumberger
Johnson& Johnson


Feel bad not having a bank but MasterCard kind of gets me that and maybe Dow the road Amazon will jump there like bidu or baba did in China.

Come to think of it I think I should sell some smaller speculative positions in favor of the larger growth stocks. Maybe that will be my plan in 2017.
You and jabes are picking good companies but the stocks are all pretty high right now.

This is where the chart watching comes in.

I don't see the point in buying stocks this high.

There are some I'm watching right now but some of the one's you guys are noting, I recently sold because of how high they've gone.

Doesn't mean they can't or won't go higher but NEVER CHASE the profits of others. You'd get beaten up doing that.

I'd tell you which ones I'm watching but it doesn't matter because invariably on a pullback you will find that there are ones you weren't looking to buy that provide far better opportunities.

In any event, IMO ones that are presenting decent opportunities at the moment are:

GOOGL
HBI
WHR
CELG
AMGN
VLO
REPYY
GM
DAL
MS
C

SO-SO:
CSCO
QCOM
INTC

The top part of that list are ones that have had a recent pullback.

I'm not pushing any of them right now, however.
That market is still pretty high but if someone is looking to get in, I recommend that start buying in slowly here if they are so inclined.

They might get a better price in the short - medium term.

Or not....



Now, on a pullback, definitely always look to improve your positions by getting better quality companies, ie BEST OF BREED BLUE CHIP STOCKS.

That's always when I end up with my best looking portfolio.

So then, APPL, VZ, FB, DIS, etc start looking real good though these stocks oftentimes don't pull back a whole lot with the overall market.

You just have to take the opportunities as they present.

Of course, over time these high grade companies will tend to out perform the overall market but it just depends where you get in at.
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Old 03-25-2017, 11:48 AM   #808
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Just for the record I wasn't advocating buying those stocks right now. Just picking a solid pretty well diversified small portfolio that would be good for a beginner.

I'm not buying anything right now so I wouldn't feel right advising someone else to. I am doing some selling.

I like yuik's picks. Johnson & Johnson was #6 on my list. However Amazon would be tough for a noob to swing at $845 a share.
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Old 03-25-2017, 12:01 PM   #809
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AMZN has great growth potential still but its valuation is so high I just keep passing on it.

There just seem better places to be.

That said, the rest of the retail industry looks like shit at the moment. Tons of value traps.

The other problem with AMZN right now is their CEOs proclivity to take a strong political side.

I've seen in the past couple of years what that has done to SBUX under Schulz.

I am expecting a deterioration of their revenue and earnings as a result.
Only time will tell.

Why CEOs take political positions publicly is something I will never understand.
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Old 03-25-2017, 12:06 PM   #810
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Here is a good place to START looking at a stock:

http://finviz.com/map.ashx

Double click on the stock.

On the left, you can see world wide stocks, etc.
You can also change the timeframe.

On the charts you can change the timeframe as well.


This is a good place for real time charts:

https://www.google.com/finance?q=IND...-j9LJLeqAHQuQE

Type in the ticker for individual stocks, ETFs, etc.

You can create your own portfolio here as well. Just create an account.
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Old 03-26-2017, 07:34 PM   #811
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Originally Posted by drjarhead View Post
See rstrobel's post above.

If you do mutual funds in a retirement vehicle like a 401K or IRA it's all fine.

If you use a brokerage account, you will get hit for taxes in an undesirable way.

Expense fees have nothing to do with it.
Neither does any load on the fund.

Since AK-104 has $50K to play with, he'd have to use a brokerage account.



Let's say the fund you've just bought picked up AAPL 10 years ago and bought it for $25.

Now it's worth $140.
You buy the fund.

Next week it goes down to $130 and your fund decides to sell a pile of it before it goes down further.

Now, you just lost $10/share.

However, at the end of the year, the fund will give you a tax bill on the $105/share profit.

So, you lost money but you pay a portion of the tax for those who gained over the years.


Mutual funds are best used in retirement vehicles, UNLESS you get it at the beginning, I suppose.


I learned this the heard way and try to pass my experience on to others.

It's one more reason I stick with individual stocks.
Occasionally, I do an ETF but I can usually do better picking the best prospects in a sector or industry so why should I blunt my returns?


You can stay diversified, which is key, pick individual stocks at the more propitious times to buy or sell, rather than getting stuck with a bunch in various spots on their respective chart.

All that said, I wish I did better than I do, and I should, but nothing goes perfect.
I tend to buy and sell too early but I still make money.

Been doing this for 3 years and 3 months.
I'm doubling the return of the market over that time.
Too much effort to do so, however. lol
I should be doing 50% returns IMO but I'm not getting close to that.
Keep learning though.
Love the insight.

Question let's say I own an ETF let's say it's RYF. If they sell Goldman for a 100% profit do I pay taxes on that at the end of the year, or do I only pay cap gains taxes when I sell my shares of the etf to realize my gains?

I thought it was the later but I don't do my own taxes so I could be wrong.

Thanks again for your contributions my peers (25-28 years old) are mostly uninterested and sadly my girlfriend goes to sleep every time I put on a Jim Cramer podcast when we are driving on ski trips.
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Old 03-26-2017, 08:08 PM   #812
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Originally Posted by yuik View Post
Love the insight.

Question let's say I own an ETF let's say it's RYF. If they sell Goldman for a 100% profit do I pay taxes on that at the end of the year, or do I only pay cap gains taxes when I sell my shares of the etf to realize my gains?

I thought it was the later but I don't do my own taxes so I could be wrong.

Thanks again for your contributions my peers (25-28 years old) are mostly uninterested and sadly my girlfriend goes to sleep every time I put on a Jim Cramer podcast when we are driving on ski trips.
You don't pay any taxes on the ETF unless you trade it and realize a gain. The shares can go up in value while you own them and you don't pay taxes until you sell them and realize the gain or until the ETF pays you a distribution.

Whatever happens within the fund is irrelevant to your personal taxes unless they pass the taxable event on to you through a dividend or cap gains distribution. Note that this is different in many European countries where you are taxed on the paper gain regardless of whether you sell it or not.


If you own RYF and they sell their GS position, the fund itself incurs a tax liability. You do not owe taxes on this; the fund owes taxes on it. They either pay that liability with cash from within the fund (thereby lowering the net asset value of the fund), offset the gain by selling a position that is at a loss (which they can't do as part of an equal weighted fund since they have to maintain the equal weighting), or they pass the tax liability on to you through a dividend or cap gains distribution (probably the most common way it is done, typically at the end of the year).

That's actually a good argument not to own an equal weighted ETF (or mutual fund). Equal weighting requires the manager to regularly rebalance the fund. That is inefficient from a tax standpoint.


p.s. Jim Cramer is widely regarded as cancer for your financial well-being.
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Old 03-26-2017, 08:08 PM   #813
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Originally Posted by yuik View Post
Love the insight.

Question let's say I own an ETF let's say it's RYF. If they sell Goldman for a 100% profit do I pay taxes on that at the end of the year, or do I only pay cap gains taxes when I sell my shares of the etf to realize my gains?

I thought it was the later but I don't do my own taxes so I could be wrong.

Thanks again for your contributions my peers (25-28 years old) are mostly uninterested and sadly my girlfriend goes to sleep every time I put on a Jim Cramer podcast when we are driving on ski trips.
That's alright.

Investing is like being chased by a bear. You don't have to outrun the bear, you just have to outrun everyone else.

My wife doesn't give a shit either. She just lets me run it all and that's best anyhow.


As for ETFs, I don't believe they're treated the same way as mutual funds because of the way they're traded.

rstrobel is a FA and he says not so I'll take him at his word. I'm pretty sure that's right.

In another fashion, don't use limited partnerships in a retirement fund generally. You lose some of the tax benefits.
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Old 03-26-2017, 08:11 PM   #814
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p.s. Jim Cramer is widely regarded as cancer for your financial well-being.
I differ with that.
IMO he gives good overall advice but I don't buy stocks he recommends, same as all the rest of them.

I don't need someone to point out a stock that's gone up 30% in the past week. LOL
Where were they last week?


I learned a lot from Jim Cramer though. Just MO.
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Old 03-26-2017, 08:15 PM   #815
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yes, MLPs and certain other investments can trigger what is called UBTI which results in a tax bill even if the investment is sheltered in an IRA. it's most commonly an issue with oil companies.

holding an MLP in an IRA is silly anyway. you lose the ability to utilize the MLP's depreciation benefits if it is placed in an IRA.
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Old 03-26-2017, 08:19 PM   #816
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AMZN has great growth potential still but its valuation is so high I just keep passing on it.

There just seem better places to be.

That said, the rest of the retail industry looks like shit at the moment. Tons of value traps.

The other problem with AMZN right now is their CEOs proclivity to take a strong political side.

I've seen in the past couple of years what that has done to SBUX under Schulz.

I am expecting a deterioration of their revenue and earnings as a result.
Only time will tell.

Why CEOs take political positions publicly is something I will never understand.
I remember talking against the absurd PE ratio of Amazon when it was in the 300s, and I have been proved wrong time and time again. So I jumped on board around 630ish. They remind me of the tech version of Goldman Sachs. Get enough smart people willing to work 50-70 hours a week and surprising things will happen. They don't trade off earnings similiar to tesla.

I could see Amazon going back to 300$ a share but I decided I wanted a small speculation position aboard their train.

I also feel like more or america leans left or at least that's what CNN and most of the media tells me (so it could be wrong due to their track record), so a left leaning CEO won't 100% tank them. It might actually help but who knows. I too would prefer ceos of the companies I owned to not disclose any political preferences to mitigate unexpected bumps.
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Old 03-26-2017, 08:23 PM   #817
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Jim Cramer is the best way to stay in tune with the market while on the treadmill or driving to work.

If you have any other podcasts that I can play on my iPhone let me know.

I wish we got Bloomberg at my work gym but the sound only works on like 2 treadmills in my building so I default to my podcasts.


I use Cramer as rough play by play of what happened and maybe ideas that I should research.

Then when I want to buy I look at my giant watch list and pick something from the top 1/3 after some research. Sadly the watch list is too big for me to go though all of it.

I could be more diligent but as of right now I don't want to invest more time.
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Old 03-26-2017, 08:27 PM   #818
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Well, AMZNs profit margin is pretty thin.

How much volume do you think they'd have to lose for that profit margin to disappear?

Not much.


However, I can't completely disagree with your limited spec play. Considered the same myself a few times.

But there's just better places to have my money.
You're young. Have at it.
I can't afford the loss.

I've got a feeling Jeff Bezos is about to get a wake up call for his arrogance, same as Howard Schulz.
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Old 03-26-2017, 11:36 PM   #819
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A minor point, but someone above mentioned selling one S&P 500 ETF and then buying another one say issued by Schwab, for tax purposes.

The IRS is on to this strategy and has issued "wash sale" rules to be sure you still pay tax if you re-enter what essentially is the same financial position within 30 days of the first sale (or purchase).

It can get complicated as there are a lot of ways to get pretty close to the same financial holding w running afoul of these rules.

Anyway, a somewhat esoteric point, but something about which all buy and sell investors should be aware.
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Old 03-28-2017, 12:33 AM   #820
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A minor point, but someone above mentioned selling one S&P 500 ETF and then buying another one say issued by Schwab, for tax purposes.

The IRS is on to this strategy and has issued "wash sale" rules to be sure you still pay tax if you re-enter what essentially is the same financial position within 30 days of the first sale (or purchase).

It can get complicated as there are a lot of ways to get pretty close to the same financial holding w running afoul of these rules.

Anyway, a somewhat esoteric point, but something about which all buy and sell investors should be aware.
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Well, AMZNs profit margin is pretty thin.

How much volume do you think they'd have to lose for that profit margin to disappear?

Not much.


However, I can't completely disagree with your limited spec play. Considered the same myself a few times.

But there's just better places to have my money.
You're young. Have at it.
I can't afford the loss.

I've got a feeling Jeff Bezos is about to get a wake up call for his arrogance, same as Howard Schulz.
Honestly fuck the retail business i like AWS and the margins they had in the cloud. I used azure for 2 years and it's pretty nice I sat in one class about aws and was like wow they have a decent moat protecting them from Microsoft and others here.


Some of the brokerage accounts maybe fidelity or vanguard advertise it calling it tax harvesting. It might be selling say mid cap equal weight and then buying mid cap growth or mid cap dividends.

You can't sell the same exact ticket symbol etf. So if I am using swabs reit etf I need to dumb it and buy vanguards.
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Old 03-30-2017, 08:57 PM   #821
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Well if a big like Scwhab or Fid is marketing a trading strategy specifically for tax harvesting then it should be good to go. I am 100% positive they have written opinions from counsel that it's kosher. I would check their disclaimers tho as even if they have vetted it their lawyers probably made them put bin some statement about how you can't rely on them for tax advice etc. Still tho if clients ever got back taxed u can be sure they would get sued and have to pay up so I thinks it's GTG from these guys.
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Old 03-30-2017, 09:02 PM   #822
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The laws regarding wash sales were written before the first mutual fund was created.

It's very unclear how they apply to ETFs, mutual funds, UITs, etc. It's a very muddy area, especially with the various products available today that will almost always have some form of overlap.

It's usually up to your CPA and how aggressive he wants to be along with his willingness to cover your ass if the IRS calls you out on it.
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Old 04-13-2017, 12:06 AM   #823
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I feel like RYF to play the finance sector may not be a sure bet. Not sure if I should buy Goldman now...

Really do want to grab some Algn first.

Also the walmart Amazon battle is interesting
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Old 04-13-2017, 03:50 PM   #824
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You already missed the run in the financial sector.

Tech is where the growth currently resides.

I'd be looking really hard at the companies that will produce the raw materials to rebuild America's infrastructure. They're tumbling on the news that Trump's infrastructure plan is in trouble. There's a lot of value out there right now.

IMHO, there is no doubt whatsoever an infrastructure bill will get passed, it has to, we've kicked this can as far down the road as we can. And when it does, you'll see a 12-15% jump in a day. The only question is are you patient enough to buy & hold until that day.

In a market with precious few opportunities this is a good one.

That's my .02
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Old 04-19-2017, 12:33 AM   #825
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Hi, new guy but been reading here for a while, first forum joined(to read the real news)- second post ever. I'm a one finger typer. I'm new to investing also. I'm 52, still have my 6 month emergency cash, debt-mortgage only to paid off in 13 years when I retire. Under advice of my credit unions free financial advisor I opened up a roth ira with Ameritrade in late February. He recommended 2 mutual funds PEYAX & PJMDX and buy 1 or 2 cheap stocks. My original plan was to start with $3000 to open account and add $500 a month to the mf's for 2017 for the full $6500 allowed. I then discovered I could do 2016 also & threw another $6500 & bought a lot of stocks(19), learning as I go. My free trading is over soon & I have a couple questions.

Mutual funds-what do you guys think of my 2, only have $2500 in them or should I continue building my own mutual fund.
Bought mainly ones with dividends, plan on adding more shares in future & going super long like APPL,BAC, F,EPD,HBI,MFA,MNDO,WMT & others. Is this wise?

Thanks for all the info you guys put in this forum, I learned a lot & it only took me 55 minutes to type this-now a 2 finger typer!
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Old 04-19-2017, 01:01 AM   #826
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the expenses on both of those mutual funds are pretty high at about 1%. I don't know how TD's platform works for A shares, are you paying an upfront commission or are the mutual funds free to trade?

when building a stock portfolio like that, make sure you're not getting charged for dividend collection. I don't think TD charges for it but I know edward jones and a few others do.

You can hire a full service financial planner who will do all your retirement planning, investment selection, estate planning, etc. for about the same price you are paying those mutual fund companies to do essentially nothing. Most charge around 1%, many will even keep their fee + your fund expenses below 1%. Since your account is currently considered a small account, it might be hard to find someone who will take you as a client billing upon your account value, but even paying someone a one time hourly planning fee isn't a bad idea. They can create a retirement plan for you and then tell you which mutual funds you should be buying.

garrett is a network of planners that will work with you regardless of account size http://www.garrettplanningnetwork.com/about

or you can listen to the peanut gallery here

p.s. don't put too much faith in the credit union's free advisor. there's four things you don't want for free: legal advice, tax advice, investment advice, and medical advice

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Old 04-19-2017, 02:12 AM   #827
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The mutual funds both say "no transaction fee". The PEYAX charged me an extra $12.92 a couple weeks after initial investment 0f $1500. PJMDX hasn't charged any extra. Need to learn more about mutual funds & not adding anymore money in them till I do. Stocks are simpler to understand for me right now. THANKS for letting me know about dividend collection. I researched it & ameritrade has free drip which I signed up for. I enjoy the challenge of this whole investing thing & right now would rather learn from the peanut gallery!
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Old 04-19-2017, 01:22 PM   #828
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I do like the idea of an hourly fee advisor to get a pro's opinion but not locked into his plans & will check out garrett. Thanks again!
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Old 04-19-2017, 07:37 PM   #829
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for mutual funds the first thing I do is look at the share class and expense ratio on morningstar. a lot of advisors will put clients into what's called a C share mutual fund which pays them an upfront commission plus an ongoing hidden trail commission that's usually 1%/year straight from the mutual fund so the client doesn't see it on their statement.

as far as the expenses goes, I look at the holdings in the mutual fund and compare them to the expense ratio. if it's just holding a bunch of large cap stocks and the expense ratio is really high then you're probably better off just buying an index fund

other things such as emerging markets, some bond sectors, and just oddball investments will naturally have high expense ratios due to the nature of those investments.
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Old 04-19-2017, 09:35 PM   #830
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CJ you should be able to pull up the full disclosure docs for each fund by typing in their symbols into Google and clicking on the various links until you find them.

These documents are sometimes dense, but they have gotten better and you can learn a lot of good general investing info as well as your fund specifics.

Strobel has provided good advice.

I would be strongly inclined to use a broad based S&P 500 index fund like SPX or SPY as the core of your portfolio and then add the various asset allocation sectors such as small cap, mid cap, international and maybe some corporate bonds.

Your focus on Dividends is not at all unreasonable given your age. But you do want growth to help meet your retirement goals. Especially since many are livings well into their 80s these days.

Good luck. Opening those accounts and getting started was the hardest part!
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Old 04-20-2017, 01:55 PM   #831
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Great idea with SPY! Now I know what an etf is, while I still have free trading, I think I'll sell some of my 19 different stocks & put the money in Spy. I got carried away with this whole investing thing! Checking my account all day & watching cnbc. I know I'll slow down once each move costs $7 Thanks again
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Old 04-20-2017, 03:41 PM   #832
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The SP appears to be making a breakout of it's bound range.

Should be good news if it can hold up.
There is belief that there are now votes in the House to pass the healthcare bill. Possible vote next week.
Mnuchin says there is a good chance for tax reform yet this year.
Cohn had positive things to say today about trade imbalance.

In other news, Venezuela seized GM factory--minor event.

Expecting market to climb up over 2400.
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Old 04-24-2017, 01:24 AM   #833
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I think rye and RYF was a dumb holding. Sold half of rye to move to an index fund.
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Old 04-26-2017, 01:33 PM   #834
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The SP appears to be making a breakout of it's bound range.

Should be good news if it can hold up.
There is belief that there are now votes in the House to pass the healthcare bill. Possible vote next week.
Mnuchin says there is a good chance for tax reform yet this year.
Cohn had positive things to say today about trade imbalance.

In other news, Venezuela seized GM factory--minor event.

Expecting market to climb up over 2400.
Charts are currently looking very strong.

Obviously, the market and individual stocks are up a fair amount since I posted the above last week.

So I'm not advising chasing right now but if you have a good stock pick, you SHOULD still get some run.

Be cautious about selling currently also. Maybe in a few days to next week or so IF you are so inclined.

Your money so do your own homework as always.

One thing I've been looking at lately is that when evaluating the EMAs, I still use the 50 day and 200 day. The 50 I still find useful for support or less often resistance levels.

However, I've dumped the 20 and 100.

I'm using the 5 and 13 day EMAs to chart shorter term moves.
When it appears the 5 is crossing UP over the 13 day, I'm buying some.
When it appears the 5 is crossing DOWN under the 13, I'm selling some.

Still doing so incrementally.

Something you guys might want to take a look at and watch for a time to formulate your own opinion of it.
Seems to be working out for me so far.
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Old 04-26-2017, 10:40 PM   #835
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Hey doc

Were you actually a DOctor for he marines?

Might be a dumb question but I initially read the name and assumed it was after some super hero or like a James Bond villain. I think I only know maybe 3-4 people my age who served so maybe that's why I didn't think of it.
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Old 04-26-2017, 11:46 PM   #836
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Hey doc

Were you actually a DOctor for he marines?

Might be a dumb question but I initially read the name and assumed it was after some super hero or like a James Bond villain. I think I only know maybe 3-4 people my age who served so maybe that's why I didn't think of it.
There are no doctors in the Marines. It's the Navy that provides the doctors as the Marines are a branch of the Navy.

I was an enlisted man.
Went to med school years later.
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Old 04-27-2017, 12:26 PM   #837
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Thinking about selling some cyber security stocks at a loss fire eye and palo a lot networks to try and lower my AGI for this year so I can max my Roth IRA again.

Not sure if it's a great plan, I can deploy the cash to like lowes or Home Depot of some medical companies (I like these even at their current premiums).

Or I could just keep the cash sidelined if we get a pullback.

I think I missed the momentum for finance and I think I'll hold off on buying more investment banks. Really wanted to buy Goldman but I think there's much better uses of capital outside of finance for the next year.


Also I saw an article since the 1950s consumer staples has been the best industry growth wise. Like 13% averaged where tech is only 9% maybe finance was 10% and medical and pharmacy was like 11%.

I know past trends are no indication of the future but it's hard to see the growth for consumer staples. But somehow Pepsi keeps doing well. Anyone else have any opinions on consumer staples ?
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Old 04-27-2017, 12:41 PM   #838
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Also I saw an article since the 1950s consumer staples has been the best industry growth wise. Like 13% averaged where tech is only 9% maybe finance was 10% and medical and pharmacy was like 11%.

I know past trends are no indication of the future but it's hard to see the growth for consumer staples. But somehow Pepsi keeps doing well. Anyone else have any opinions on consumer staples ?
Staples, in general, have valuations too high for me and their dividend yields are decent but not great. They'd have to pull back for me to buy.

That's me though. YMMV.

AND, as you are noting, time horizon is a significant consideration.

MO is that there will be better opportunities to get into some of those.
I keep looking at them, however, and their valuations don't come down much so you must consider that an how they fit into YOUR investment scheme.

I'm always looking for deals then I make money primarily on my trades. That's how I go about it.

Some people just look for good companies to buy and hold for the long term, making money off slow steady growth and good dividend yields.

Still others have other strategies.

Stick to your strategy, whatever it is. Don't keep changing that strategy unless it is a poorly advised strategy in the first place, in which case you never should have done so to start.
Continually changing your strategy to chase prior gains others have made will just keep you losing money.
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Old 04-27-2017, 12:57 PM   #839
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So yuik, what is your strategy?

Be honest about that, especially to yourself.

What's your mindset?
How does your brain work?
How do YOU approach the market, or maybe how should you?

Identify that approach and then you'll know better what to do. We'd sure know better what kind of advice to give you.
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Old 04-28-2017, 12:33 AM   #840
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So yuik, what is your strategy?

Be honest about that, especially to yourself.

What's your mindset?
How does your brain work?
How do YOU approach the market, or maybe how should you?

Identify that approach and then you'll know better what to do. We'd sure know better what kind of advice to give you.


Will at this over the weekend, when I am in front of a computer and not a phone. It has evolved in the past 6 years (still in my 20s).

All of your posts are very sound in my opinion.

In short it's buy and hold with a slight emphasis being tax efficient as possible especially in my etf or retirement accounts.

The new addition from the past year is only 33% at most of the capital I deploy should be on non profitable companies.
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