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Old 12-19-2009, 02:15 PM   #1
amd65
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Default AK finishing, 1911 refinishing question

I am almost done with my AK and I am about to finish it with some sort of bake on finish, most likely from Brownell's. The issue here is I have this 1911 that shoots better than any gun I have ever owned that I wish to refinish as well. I want to know what kind of finish is good for painting an AK receiver and a 1911 frame and slide without messing with my tolerances on the pistol very much? I also think the 1911 has an aluminum frame and wonder if this will be an issue in concern with what kind of paint I choose? Any advice on how I should go about this? Should I sand blast the 1911 or bead blast it and rough it up a bit with fine sandpaper so as not to remove too much material from the gun and ruin the tight tolerances which I believe makes this gun such a good shooter? It is nickel plated, which I hate, can I just strip it with some kind of chemical and re-paint it? Any advice is appreciated. I don't want to screw up my best gun, but it looks like shit with this old nickel finish.

Last edited by amd65; 12-19-2009 at 04:23 PM.
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Old 12-19-2009, 09:22 PM   #2
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i bead blasted and used gunkote on this peters stahl and am very pleased with results buildup is very minimal but nothing will stick to nickel

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Old 12-19-2009, 09:33 PM   #3
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That looks great!!! I was planning on using gun kote but I heard moly resin might be better. I hope my pistol turns out that good. Did you parkerize first? Also, I was hoping that sandblasting would work because I don't have any bead media.
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Old 12-19-2009, 09:52 PM   #4
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Man, have I every been through this a bunch of times. Ok, let me give what is to most the hardest thing to hear; you REALLY need to sandblast your firearm to get the very best finish. No, you don't have to, but yes, if it's going to look OK, and not "spray painted" you really need to s'blast them.

There are several good spray on coatings out there. I've used gunkote, Duracoat and (gasp) VHT hi-temp paint. They all work pretty well.

You can also parkerize this stuff at home with a kit, and it's not too hard to do actually (it's kinda fun in a high school chemistry kind of way...)you (again) MUST sandblast first, or you're wasting your time.

On your aluminum frame; obviously you can't part park it, but can certainly paint it. Brownells Alumahyde works well here.

Oh, and I did mean sandblast, not bead blast. You HAVE to expose fresh metal where as beadblasting "smooths" the finish without abrading it. If you have access to both, a bead blasted finish looks KILLER on aluminum...
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Old 12-20-2009, 02:19 PM   #5
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Cool, I definitely plan on sandblasting both the AK receiver and the 1911 frame and slide. I am glad I don't have to bead blast because I don't have any bead blasting media. I also was definitely planning on parkerizing the steel parts first as well.

What I really wanna know is, what is the best heat cured finish that Brownell's has to offer to paint my pistol? I need a paint that is durable, goes on thin, and also has a bit of slick to it so the slide will move easily along the frame and it must stand up to this constant friction. Thanks for all the help so far.
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Old 12-20-2009, 02:57 PM   #6
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Go with Norrell's Moly Resin. Used it for years, comes in a variety of colors. It's only a few .001's thick, and slippery. You need to sandblast for good adhesion.
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Old 12-21-2009, 08:23 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TopGun
Go with Norrell's Moly Resin. Used it for years, comes in a variety of colors. It's only a few .001's thick, and slippery. You need to sandblast for good adhesion.
+1

I like DuraCoat as well, but I don't know if you can get it from Brownell's...
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Old 12-21-2009, 10:13 PM   #8
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Whatever you get, make sure it is not in a spray can. Even a $5 Harbor Freight throwaway plastic airbrush does a lot better job than the aerosol cans. Personally, I like Gunkote. They make a version that is self lubricating. I usually buy it direct from their website.
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Old 12-22-2009, 09:37 AM   #9
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Whan you "sand blast" it, try to not use silica sand. Silica sand causes some pretty serious health problems. I use Dupont Star-Blast in my blasting cabinet. Yes, you can abrasive blast the fame but "shoot it" from further away and use lower pressure if you can set that. You want to just roughen up the surface a little, not remove the Anodizing.

The other poster is correct: Don't wast time with a spray can. Get an airbrush. The problem with spray cans is that the finish contains a lot of solids, which block the nozzle and causes splatters.

Yes, you can spray the rails on the slide and the frame...if you use Gunkote. The Gunkote Molly Resin will burnish. (I don't know about the others) That means that things may be a little tight going back together but with a little use, the tight parts will wear against each other and be smoother than bare metal.

The biggest secret to a nice looking and durable finish is the preparation. Abrasive blast it and clean it several times. Then clean it some more and keep it clean. The oil from your fingerprint or a dust mote under the un-cured finish can ruin the job.

When you cure Gunkote, don't use the kitchen oven unless:
1...You plan on cleaning it really well afterwards. Gunkote curing vapors will transfer solids to the sides of the oven.
2...You use plenty of ventilation. The fumes stink and are deadly.
3...The significant other is away for the day.
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Old 12-22-2009, 10:29 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironbutt270
you REALLY need to sandblast your firearm to get the very best finish
Amen. So many people wanting to get professional results free of cost or effort. #80-#120 Al02

And don't waste your time with a highly marketed but really primitive and completely inappropriate finish like duracoat. Stick with the thermally cured, bonded solid film resins like molycoat or gunkote, or (not my preference, but decent) cerracoat.
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Old 12-22-2009, 05:03 PM   #11
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I do alot of this.

1.) I agree with everything Mark said.
2.) Clean and degrease thouroughly.
3.) Sand blast do not glass bead.
4.) Clean and degrease. From this point forward do not touch weapon with your bare hands.
5.) Park or K-Phos here if applicable to metal. Clean again, degrease if you fondled the gun admiring your park job.
6.) Spray as directed. Do not cover parts that may lose coating due to impact. (Hammer face for instance) You may touch with bare hands after coating has dried.
7.) Bake as directed.
8.) Once cooled check parts fit and reassemble whatever it was you pulled apart and coated.

Rick
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Old 12-31-2009, 02:09 AM   #12
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Gunplumber did you mean Moly Resin?

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Old 01-03-2010, 10:18 AM   #13
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"Molybdenum disulphide based thermally cured coating" Not too particular on brand name. I have tried GunKote and found it gives good results. There are other similar brands. I personally do NOT care for the norell brand, but others seem to like it.

Now I have my own made to my specs.
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Old 01-03-2010, 03:24 PM   #14
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i have not tried gunkote, buit did own a rifle with gk -which seemed good.

as for moly resin, it's -just about as good as the gk, but i think it may dry a lot quiker and may be easier to work with for a beginner. that said, get either and worry not a bit as all gun paints will eventually scratch up. none is better by much.
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Old 01-03-2010, 07:44 PM   #15
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Cool, I think I will go with either the Brownell's GunKote or Molyresin. I have a nice airbrush, a Thayer and Chandler double action, which I am pretty experienced with so I don't think painting will be the problem. I need to be sure to degrease well, what do you guys use?
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Old 01-04-2010, 09:10 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amd65
Cool, I think I will go with either the Brownell's GunKote or Molyresin. I have a nice airbrush, a Thayer and Chandler double action, which I am pretty experienced with so I don't think painting will be the problem. I need to be sure to degrease well, what do you guys use?
acetone then bring metal up to 100F quick once over with spray, let dry
then two more light coats drying a little between .then bake, if you use brownells just follow directions and you can't go wrong
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